An Overview of Electronics Industry

An Overview of Electronics Industry

Electronics industry is a term that refers to a scope of business that focuses on the creation, design, production, sale of devices such as integrated circuits, transistors, semiconductors, computers, stereos, televisions, and radios. In the United States, electronic products saw an increase in sale from 1927 to 1990, where the total sale grew from $200 million to more than $266 million. As such, the presence of electronic products have been attributed to transformations in homes, offices, and factories and emerged as one of the most crucial economic sectors, rivaling even industries of automotive, steel, and chemical in size.

The electronics industry began its live when the two-element electron tube was invented by John Ambrose Flemming in 1904 and the three-element tube in 1906 by Lee De Forest. Following the invention of these things, development of commercial radio took place in the 1920s. Since then, radio sales were boosted to $300 million by the end of the decade. When the transistor was invented by William Shockley, Walter Brattain, and John Bardeen in 1947, the industry leapt forward even further. A transistor is much more durable, lighter, and smaller compared to vacuum tubes and as such the age of miniaturization of electronic devices commenced. Integrated circuits were invented in the 1950s. Their existence made it possible for several different circuits to be integrated into just one piece of circuit. Analog devices were introduced in the 1960s, making it possible to store a great amount of information on a single chip of silicon.

The electronics industry advanced even more when laser and optical devices, microwave devices, and digital electronics were introduced since the 1970s. The development of space technology also owes its existence to advances made in the sector of electronics industry. The introduction of personal computer was inaugurated by the revolution in the electronics industry as well. Factories began implementing robots that are guided by computers. The market for pop music and culture benefited from storage systems and electronic data transmission.

The US consumer electronics industry declined in the 1960s due to the inability of manufacturers to stay relevant against bombardment of foreign products—in terms of pricing and quality. Japanese companies such as Hitachi and Sony produced far more reliable products. US manufacturers managed to become world’s leading producer of the development and assembly of semiconductors by the 1980s. Semiconductors were essential in the 1990s in the production of personal computers and other electronic devices.